NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz6u R1 to A1 Q4

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NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz6u R1 to A1 Q4

http://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/2kghni/science_ama_series_we_are_scientists_and/cllc333

Jon Jenkins (@jonmjenkins), Co-Investigator, responsible for designing the Kepler science pipeline and planet search algorithms

[–]Universu 1 point 4 hours ago

What is the difference between Kepler and that of future missions e.g. TESS and PLATO?

[–]NASAKeplerScientists and Engineers|Exoplanet Science|Astrophysics[F,S] 3 points an hour ago

JJ: The main differences between these missions are the sizes of the fields of view and how long each observes their field of view.

Kepler is a telescope with a 1.4-m primary and a 0.95-m aperture and it observed a single 116 square degree FOV for four years continuously. More info at http://www.kepler.nasa.gov. Kepler is searching for Earth-size habitable zone planets orbiting Sun-like stars. Kepler’s run out costs are ~$600M.TESS is a NASA Explorer mission that will observe nearly the entire sky over a two year mission starting in 2017, and has four 10-cm cameras, each with a 24×24 degree FOV (so about 20X the area  of Kepler’s FOV all together). More info at http://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/. TESS will focus on finding  short period planets less than 2 Earth radii orbiting solar-like stars with the goal of finding great targets for follow up and characterization by telescopes such as the James Webb Space  Telescope. TESS will cost ~$200M. PLATO is an ESA mission selected for launch in 2024 and will consist of ~32 small telescopes, each  with a 1100 deg2 FoV and a pupil diameter of 120 mm. The FOVs of the 32 cameras overlap with a total FOV of 2250 square degrees. PLATO will cover about 50% of the sky over its proposed mission lifetime. {PLATO is very interested in finding Earth-size habitable zone planets that can be followed up and characterized. More info at: http://sci.esa.int/plato/42278-mission-concept/. PLATO will cost at least $647M, but individual countries that participate will chip in for their  scientists.

[–]Universu 1 point 39 minutes ago

Thanks very much for the comparison, enlightening, very interesting missions indeed. May Kepler  second light shine as bright as the first:)

NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8f R2 Q7 TVsignal

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NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8f R2 Q7 TVsignal

http://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/2kghni/science_ama_series_we_are_scientists_and/clle0dw?context=3

Tom Barclay (@mrtommyb), guest observer program director and research scientist

[–]Universu 1 point an hour ago

Have the nearest exoplanet already reaceived our first radio and tv broadcast?

[–]NASAKeplerScientists and Engineers|Exoplanet Science|Astrophysics[F,S] 2 points 27 minutes ago

(TB): Yes, radio signals travel at the speed of light and Alpha Cen is only 3 light years away.

NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8i R3 Q3 186f

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NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8i R3 Q3 186f

http://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/2kghni/science_ama_series_we_are_scientists_and/clle7ue?context=3

Tom Barclay (@mrtommyb), guest observer program director and research scientist

[–]Universu 1 point 4 hours ago

Which is the most earthlike of all the discovered exoplanets?

[–]NASAKeplerScientists and Engineers|Exoplanet Science|Astrophysics[F,S] 1 point 20 minutes ago

(TB): Probably the planet Kepler-186f that Elisa Quintana (who’s answering questions as EQ) worked on. It’s an Earth-sized planet orbiting within the habitable zone of a star that is about half the size of the Sun.

NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8L R4 Q6 FOVK

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NASA 102814 Keppler Redditz8L R4 Q6 FOVK

http://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/2kghni/science_ama_series_we_are_scientists_and/cllf13u?context=3

Fergal Mullally, SETI Institute scientist and lead researcher for the upcoming Kepler Four-Year catalog

[–]Universu 1 point an hour ago

How was the Field of View of Kepler chosen?

[–]NASAKeplerScientists and Engineers|Exoplanet Science|Astrophysics[F,S] 1 point 6 minutes ago

(FM): It was chosen to be in the northern hemisphere, where most ground based telescopes could follow it up. It had to filled with lots of stars, but not too many so they crowded each other out. And then the position was tweaked so the brightest stars landed on the gaps between the detectors so they wouldn’t spoil the images.

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